The Simple Shift to Solve Photography Posing Overwhelm

Sep 27, 2021
 

95% of photographers approach posing in the exact same way. They scour Pinterest, buy posing guides, download posing apps and still they feel like something is missing.  They desperately want to stand out but are struggling and feel undervalued. 

So what is the solution? 

Stop trying to memorize poses. 

The one simple posing pivot that will take you from a few go-to poses to a brave new world of endless possibilities is categorical thinking. 

So what's categorical thinking? It goes back to some pretty cool brain science. We have evolved to use the least amount of energy possible throughout our evolution. When we were prehistoric humans we needed to reserve energy because food was scarce, we didn’t burn energy for the fun of it. 

If we were running, it was either from danger or after food. Because our brain is a physiological organ, it also reserves energy. Our brain is constantly looking for the path of least resistance and because of this a lot of our thought processes are on autopilot. 

When that happens, our brain literally stops itself from moving forward. And this is what causes those blank moments. So when we try to memorize poses, our brain becomes overwhelmed and only a tiny fraction of what we tried to memorize comes through in our work. 

Using categorical thinking is a way to save energy in our minds. It is impossible to remember hundreds of poses in your mind but you can categorize similar poses into similar elements. 

For example, you can break all poses down into four simple posing foundations; standing, sitting, kneeling and laying. Using categorical thinking will free up your creativity and open up a whole new world of possibilities. 


To learn more be sure to join my Free Facebook Community here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/StrippedDownBoudoir for free training and resources to help you become the valued photographer you truly desire to be.

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